Current Students

 

Katie Kranz is from Millbury, Ohio and graduated from the University of Michigan with a BS in Biomolecular Science in 2014.

 

 

Zach Landhuis is from Orange City, Iowa and graduated from Northwestern College with a BA in Biology Health Professions in 2016.

 

 

Brianna Bermudez is from Albuquerque, New Mexico and graduated from Eastern New Mexico University with a BS in Forensic Science in 2015. Her research involves the examination of DNA variation in human femora.

 

Emily Heinz is from Algonquin, Illinois and graduated from Central Michigan University with a BS in Biomedical Sciences in 2014. Her research focuses on the effects of worn clothing and burial soil mixtures on the traceability of next-generation 16S bacterial profiles to a habitat or location.

 

Graduates

 

Rachel Aikman's research focused on the development of a technique to age bloodstain evidence using RNA degradation.  

 

 

Kimberly Anderson's research involved developing a multiplex SNP assay to predict hair pigmentation levels in individuals of European ancestry. Kim is currently employed by the Indiana State Police Forensic Laboratory.

 

 

Tim Antinick's research involved determining intra-bone variation and short term DNA loss in buried bones. He is employed by the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences in Houston, TX.

 

 

Alyssa Badgley's research focused on assessing how time and storage conditions influence the ability of next-generation 16S bacterial profiles to accurately trace soil evidence back to a habitat of origin.

 

 

Amy Barber's research involved whole genome amplification for forensic DNA analysis. Amy is currently employed by the Massachusetts State Crime Lab.

 

 

Ashley Doran's research focused on optimizing techniques for collecting, isolating, and analyzing trace DNA from fingernail evidence. Ashley is currently employed by the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) in Delaware.

 

 

Amanda Fazi's research focused on a highly sensitive sex determination assay for degraded DNA.  Amanda is currently employed by the Michigan State Police.

 

 

Ken Eilert's research involved examining different DNA polymerases with the intent to counteract PCR inhibition caused by several inhibitors found in the forensics field. He is currently employed by the Indiana State Police Forensic Laboratory in Indianapolis.

 

 

Becky Elk's research involved DNA analysis of teeth recovered from the Voegtly Cemetary in Pittsburgh, PA.

 

 

Michael Gehring's research involved mitochondrial DNA analysis from improvised explosive devices.

 

 

Stephen Gicale's research involved exploring the effect of cyanoacrylate fuming on DNA obtained from a deflagrated pipe bomb and whether it helps preserve DNA on evidence stored over time.  Stephen is currently employed at a U.S. Government crime lab.

 

 

Kamila Gomez’s research involved the recovery and quantification of DNA from improvised explosive devices. Kamila is currently employed at the Trinidad and Tobago Forensic Science Centre.

 

 

Liz Graffy's research involved alkaline digestion of head hair for DNA extraction and analysis purposes. Liz is currently employed by Independent Forensics in Illinois.

 

 

Scott Grammer’s research involved assessing the feasibility of obtaining a genetic profile from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) that employ a wireless electronic triggering mechanism as a means of detonation. Scott is currently employed by the Indianapolis-Marion County lab.

 

 

Lisa Hebda's research compared microbial DNA extraction kits, as well as standard extraction methods, on the removal of PCR inhibitors and recovery of DNA from buried skeletal remains. She is currently employed by the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) in Delaware.

 

 

Shane Hoffmann’s research involved the recovery of DNA from improvised explosive device containers.  He is currently employed by the FBI as a Forensic Scientist in DNA unit I.

 

 

Mac Hopkins's research involved multivariate statistical evaluation of bacetrial rRNA sequencing to identify soil evidence. Mac is currently conducting next-generation sequencing at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

 

 

Carrie Jackson's research involved developing a more sensitive DNA based sexing technique.

 

 

 

Kim Jennings' research involved aging blowflies using gene expression.

 

 

 

Ellen Jesmok's research involved bacterial rRNA sequencing to trace soil evidence back to a crime scene. She is currently employed at the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension Forensic Science Service.

 

 

 

Sara Jubelirer’s research involved the use of hair pigmentation gene SNPs in estimating an individual's hair color. She is currently employed by the Pennsylvania State police.

 

 

 

Brianne Kiley’s research involved the creation of an assay for sex determination from low quality DNA. She is currently employed by the Phoenix, Arizona crime lab.

 

 

 

Stefanie Kremer's research involved DNA analysis of improvised explosive devices (IED's) using miniSTRs.  Stefanie is currently employed with the Hamilton County Coroner's Office Crime Laboratory.

 

 

 

Erin Lenz’s research involved developing techniques for identifying soil evidence through microbial fingerprinting.  She is currently employed by the Indiana State Police Forensic Laboratory in Indianapolis.

 

 

Jade McDaniel's research involved the effects of multiple handlers on DNA analysis from post-blast improvised explosive devices (IEDs). She is employed at an Ohio crime lab.

 

 

Michelle Metchikian's research involved the recovery and feasibility of mitochondrial DNA analysis from spent cartridge casings. She is employed at the Glendale, CA crime laboratory.

 

 

Melissa Meyer's research focused on microbial DNA profiling for comparing and identifying soil. She is currently employed by the Indiana State Police Forensic Laboratory in Indianapolis.

 

 

Cory Michaud's research involved determining a simplified field storage technique of collected tissues at crime scenes. She is currently pursuing a PhD.

 

 

Ashley Mottar's research focused on optimizing techniques for DNA retrieval, extraction, and STR analysis of spent cartridge casings. Ashley is currently employed by the Michigan State Police Forensic Science Division.

 

 

Lindsay Murray's research involved examining bones from a tumulus. She is currently emplyed by Bode forensics.

 

 

Mike Mutolo's research involved the identification of Brucella from ancient skeletal remains.

 

 

Alicya Orlando's research focused on DNA recovery and identification of the handler from fired bullet casings.

 

 

Shannon Peters' research focused on the effectiveness of using tape lifts on DNA recovery.  She is currently employed at the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) in Delaware.

 

 

Sarah Rambadt's research focused on optimizing collection techniques for fabric evidence.  She is currently employed by the Michigan State Police.

 

 

Becca Ray's research involved isolating DNA from spent cartridge casings. She is currently employed by the Michigan State Police.

 

 

Stephanie Rennick's research involved examining ancient skeletal remains from a tumulus in Albania. She is currently employed by Strand Analytical Laboratories in Indiana.

 

 

Christina Rauzi's research focused on ancient skeletal remains from Albania. She is currently employed at the Wyoming State Crime Lab.

 

 

Elizabeth Shattuck's research focused on the geographic origins of illegally produced items made from endangered Hawksbill seaturtle shells. She is currently employed at a Washington State Patrol crime lab.

 

 

Suzanne Shunn's research involved determining ethnicity of skull remains from Fort Michilimackinac in northern Michigan. She is currently employed by the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) in Delaware.

 

 

Ethan Smith’s research involved developing techniques for identifying soil evidence through microbial fingerprinting using qRT-PCR. He is currently employed at a Washington State Patrol crime lab.

 

 

Shannon Soltysiak's research involved alkaline digestion of pubic hair for DNA extraction and analysis. She is currently employed by the crime lab in the office of the Chief Medical Examiner in New York.

 

 

Pictured Below: Lauren Stancheck, Lisa Ramos, Scott Bruskl, Andrea Halvorson, and Danielle Albert are all employed by the Michigan State Police. Lisa Misner and Virginia Clemmer are employed by the Wisconsin Crime Lab and the Indiana State Police Forensic Laboratory, respectively.

Students Home. Faculty/Staff. Students. Requirements. Manuscripts. Historical Cases. The Laboratory. Events. Links. Contacts. Forensic Science Program                                         School of Criminal Justice
Michigan State University   560A Baker Hall        East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517)353-7133            Fax: (517)432-1787     E-mail: forsci@msu.edu wp77c095ca_0f.jpg wp75e1a56e_0f.jpg wpc1cde3ec_0f.jpg
Giltner Hall houses the Forensic Biology Laboratory,
and contains all labs necessary for teaching and research